Review of Montana, Montana


Friendiness
Star Rating - 7/25/2015
I am black, my husband is white; all I've ever wanted to do is visit the lakes and mountains of Montana. I am wondering how likely it is to be accepted there in terms of jobs (going for PA), friends, schools, etc. I know Montana has a very low population of black people, so it's not too farfetched to estimate that most won't know what to think of me. Thanks in advance, for anyone who can answer.
Angie | Pensacola, FL
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6 Replies


I am just so sorry that you have to even think about how you would be received. I understand what you were saying and I wish racism didn't exist in our country. But, I have to say that you need to just DO IT and see what you get. Don't keep yourself from enjoying life because you might be treated badly. Just don't respond to people if you meet up with trouble. Smile and be friendly and more than likely, people will respond in kind.
Gretchen | Columbus, KS | Report Abuse

I grew up in TN, where racism was plentiful and quiet. The N word was the norm in the 50s and 60s. All that said, I left TN in 1969. I've lived in many of our U.S. states. Now that I'm approaching 70, I look back on the racial experience. I went to a tech school in DC in 1974 on the GI Bill, and was the only White male in the school of 100+ Inner City Black males. Young Black males were angry in DC in 1974; however, my experience in the Navy had shown me that I wasn't racist. Still, I did realize, but whatever racism I bore was not overt primarily because I had little experience with people of color at that age, much less the revolution in our country during the Vietnam War. Now, at this stage of life, and having lived in a number of states--both Metro areas and small towns. My personal experience is that the less a person knows of the world, the more they are likely to be "quietly' racist, homophobic, and otherwise into the "us versus them" point of view. I dated a Black lady for 3 years and our most heated topics was "her" racism. "I'm not racist," she said. "Only White people are racist!" While this is certainly true, my experience taught among Black, Vietnamese, Hispanic, and other races taught me that in the final analysis, people are people. They want to raise a family in prosperity, send the children into the world with healthy values, and retire with dignity. Racism, while it has existed for a thousand years, is not the priority of most of us. Point of all this being, be your beautiful self. Conquer your own racism first (if it exists) and that alone will help everyone else with theirs. Blessings to you both!
Dan | Geneseo, IL | Report Abuse

I grew up in TN, where racism was plentiful and quiet. The N word was the norm in the 50s and 60s. All that said, I left TN in 1969. I've lived in many of our U.S. states. Now that I'm approaching 70, I look back on the racial experience. I went to a tech school in DC in 1974 on the GI Bill, and was the only White male in the school of 100+ Inner City Black males. Young Black males were angry in DC in 1974; however, my experience in the Navy had shown me that I wasn't racist. Still, I did realize, but whatever racism I bore was not overt primarily because I had little experience with people of color at that age, much less the revolution in our country during the Vietnam War. Now, at this stage of life, and having lived in a number of states--both Metro areas and small towns. My personal experience is that the less a person knows of the world, the more they are likely to be "quietly' racist, homophobic, and otherwise into the "us versus them" point of view. I dated a Black lady for 3 years and our most heated topics was "her" racism. "I'm not racist," she said. "Only White people are racist!" While this is certainly true, my experience taught among Black, Vietnamese, Hispanic, and other races taught me that in the final analysis, people are people. They want to raise a family in prosperity, send the children into the world with healthy values, and retire with dignity. Racism, while it has existed for a thousand years, is not the priority of most of us. Point of all this being, be your beautiful self. Conquer your own racism first (if it exists) and that alone will help everyone else with theirs. Blessings to you both!
Dan | Geneseo, IL | Report Abuse

There are areas in the western part of the state to be aware. Ravalli, Sanders, and Flathead Counties have contingents of White Supremacists. For the most part, you'll have less problems in Montana than in other states. There is a live and let live attitude that persists even in the Trump era. You would probably like Missoula and Bozeman.
Thomas | Billings, MT | Report Abuse

I HAVE LIVED IN MONTANA ALL MY LIFE AND SEEN SEVERAL BLACK PEOPLE OVER THE YEARS. NO ONE WILL BOTHER YOU. IN FACT MANY WILL WANT TO TALK WITH YOU BEING SO LITTLE CONTACT WITH BLACK FOLKS.
SAM | Davenport, FL | Report Abuse

I'm thinking you're too worried about the race card to really enjoy the lakes & mountains. People aren't prejudice by location. Prejudice & racism is on an individual basis.
Karen | Great Falls, MT | Report Abuse
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