Home  / Profile

fr

Highlights

Life Stage: Young and Single
Occupation: Printing/Editing/Writing
Enjoys:
Website(s):

Favorites

No favorite places yet.

Paid Quiz Results

Quiz is not taken yet. Take the Quiz.

Free Quiz Results

Quiz is not taken yet. Take the Quiz.

Reviews & Comments


Grass Valley, CA


re: Scenic, but with a price - 12/28/2009
- 9/8/2012
Becki, I lived in Grass Valley for a year and a half. Went to movies at the Del Oro downtown, or at the Magic City Theatre in Nevada City. Sound familiar to you? Or did you not notice those parts of Grass Valley either?
If you've never seen crowds in Grass Valley then you're blind, because they're there most weekends. And just so you know, when you see those ultra skinny guys in dirty clothes with sores on their faces, they're meth users and they're not hard to spot in the area. But I'm sure you didn't notice that either.
But I'm sure Grass Valley is ideal for you; Kmart for shopping and Mountain Mikes for fine dining.

San Angelo, TX


re: Peace of mind - 11/19/2010
- 1/30/2012
Elizabeth, from my experience Texas is welcoming to just about anyone. I think it is the ones who come here with a chip on their shoulder about "closed minded" viewpoints that feel the most out of place. I think the key to being happy in Texas is just accepting people for who they are, and accepting their warmth and welcoming nature with no strings attached. You don't have to talk religion and politics with everyone, and you don't have to trumpet your own views.

San Angelo, TX


re: Peace of mind - 11/19/2010
- 12/4/2011
I moved to Amarillo, Texas from California. And even with my tattoos and obviously not conservative demeanor, I was always treated wonderfully by nearly everyone I've met in Texas, from Amarillo, to Abilene to College Station. That's why I've decided to live in Texas for the rest of my life; no matter your politics or religion, the people are the nicest I've ever met. And I've lived in CA, NV, WA, OR, WY, and ID!

College Station, TX


Great place for students and families - 4/30/2011
College Station is really in the center of one of the most beautiful parts of the state of Texas, the Brazos Valley. The whole landscape is green meadows, post oak trees and small creeks and streams. There is abundant wildlife not seen in most other parts of the country that I've lived in (the western U.S.) such as armadillos, cardinals, gulf coast toads and dozens of breeds of birds for bird watchers. The winters are generally mild and the humidity is much lower than east Texas areas such as Houston, about an hour away. But the humidity is present enough to keep the landscape green nearly year round.
College Station is ideally located close to Houston, about two hours from Austin, and three from Dallas; and the drive to each destination is easy and scenic.
The city of Bryan borders just north of University Drive, and it definitely feels like the wrong side of the tracks. While College Station feels newer, cleaner and better designed, Bryan seems neglected and decaying. Most of the rents are very close in price between the two towns, so a decent place to live in College Station is not out of the question.
As for rentals, CS is very affordable, even for newer, nicer apartments that college students can afford. The home prices, however, are higher than one would expect; they seem above that of Dallas, closer to those of Austin. But I guess this is because the town has very little traffic, country views from all sides, and low crime.
The centerpiece of the town is Texas A&M University. The campus is huge and spectacular; with beautiful buildings, lots of green space and walking and biking routes. The university also runs a shuttle service for its students, which seems to go into the late evening hours.
And for younger guys interested in Texas A&M, the college girls here are the most beautiful I've ever seen, and they are everywhere.
Unlike many college towns, this one doesn't seem to attract as much of the "screw off" students who are only in school to party.
The people of this area don't feel as classically Texan as Amarillo or other parts of Texas I've been to, but they reflect the tradition of being unfailingly polite and friendly, unlike most of the people in Austin.
The city itself has many small, though underwhelming public parks. Short walking trails or small activity areas, combined with little garbage cleanup (most of the local waterways are choked with garbage and litter) make you seek out parks outside of town.
There is little work here beyond service industries, so CS may not be great for long term living. But it's great for college students.

Reno, NV


re: So many negatives - 10/19/2008
- 9/10/2010
Winter does start the second week of October, at least it did in October 2007, when I lived there. And it last until the end of April, 2007 (the week began at 32 degrees during the day, and by the end of the week it rose to lower 80s). Yes, the lights of the casinos are bright, the buildings themselves are ugly and tacky. The apartmet complexes are run down, and graffiti is everywhere. I lived in Reno because I was a student at UNR, which got tagged twice, in mulitple locations while I was there, as did my apartment complex. Crime IS an issue, female students were getting attacked and raped on the UNR campus, and one was eventually killed nearby. Yes, Reno is warmer than Vermont or Ohio. But freezing temps for almost six months is cold to most people. Especially if you're from Oregon, California or someplace else that isn't covered in ice eight months a year.

Long Beach, CA


re: Universitites and colleges - 12/30/2009
- 2/5/2010
Oana, I'm from California and have gone to school there in the past. Cost of living throughout the state is very expensive, much more than most of the rest of the U.S. Cost of tuition at California universities, however, is pretty affordable, especially at the Cal States (Univ of Cal is more expensive). Southern California in general is cheaper to live than northern, but less desireable (more crime and traffic in the south). The weather, along the coasts is very pleasant. If you go on the California State University website you can see links to all the campuses (from Cal State San Francisco all the way down to San Diego) and find tuition info there; although these change yearly because of California's budget problems. Many Cal States have raised fees and tuition while also reducing class sizes, so you want to make sure the major you want is accepting new applicants; it's not enough to be accepted to the school itself. I chose to pursue my university education in Texas because of less overcrowding and lower fees and tuition. But if your heart is set on California, you have many Cal State options in nearly all parts of the state, except for the eastern edges. I've lived most of my life in California, and have been to all parts of it. Send me a message if you need further info. Good luck.

Long Beach, CA


re: Universitites and colleges - 12/30/2009
- 2/5/2010
Oana, I'm from California and have gone to school there in the past. Cost of living throughout the state is very expensive, much more than most of the rest of the U.S. Cost of tuition at California universities, however, is pretty affordable, especially at the Cal States (Univ of Cal is more expensive). Southern California in general is cheaper to live than northern, but less desireable (more crime and traffic in the south). The weather, along the coasts is very pleasant. If you go on the California State University website you can see links to all the campuses (from Cal State San Francisco all the way down to San Diego) and find tuition info there; although these change yearly because of California's budget problems. Many Cal States have raised fees and tuition while also reducing class sizes, so you want to make sure the major you want is accepting new applicants; it's not enough to be accepted to the school itself. I chose to pursue my university education in Texas because of less overcrowding and lower fees and tuition. But if your heart is set on California, you have many Cal State options in nearly all parts of the state, except for the eastern edges. I've lived most of my life in California, and have been to all parts of it. Send me a message if you need further info. Good luck.

Grass Valley, CA


Scenic, but with a price - 12/28/2009
This little town is nestled in thick green forests of Gold Country. The weather is warm most of the year, with only light rain in winter. Some snow, but very little ice. For shopping there is almost nothing (unless you love KMart), requiring a trip down the hill to Auburn (about 15 miles) and the restaraunts are just average (in quality, the prices are sky high). Grass Valley and next door Nevada City are very historic, with lots of architecture and relics from California's gold rush. Unfortunately, the negatives mostly outweigh the positives for this area. Cost of living is ridiculous; homes less than fifty years old are almost all well over $300 K. That's why you'll see tons of little shacks on tiny plots all over town (even on main street). Traffic is bad because it's California, and also the roads are old, small, worn out and badly designed (get used to cars backed up through three or four stoplights). The whole town seems carved out of the hilly forests, so everything is squeezed in (many houses and places of business have their front doors less than ten feet from the street). The surrounding forests are also a haven for the criminal element. Anti-government survivalist types waiting for the apocolypse and druggies cooking meth are pretty common. Residents seem either very wealthy (to afford the ridiculous homes) or very poor (who live in the shacks). Also, young people between the ages of 18-28 seem an endangered species; mostly its families with young children or retirement aged. Sacramento is only an hour to the west, Reno 90 minutes to the east. If you don't mind paying for the beauty and suffocating in the crowds and traveling long distance for shopping and entertainment, then maybe you can handle Grass Valley.

Fort Worth, TX


re: The only people who love it never lived anywhe
- 12/26/2009
Ann, I disagree as much as possible. I've lived in Washington state, Oregon, Nevada, Idaho, Wyoming and California (San Bernardino, Banning, Beaumont, Victorville, Palm Springs, Grass Valley and Cabazon to name a few). DFW area is nicer than all those places combined. The people are nicer, drive with more courtesy, the plains ARE beautiful, the cost of living is affordable and some people LIKE the hot weather (beats the freezing temps of Washington, Idaho, Wyoming and Reno, Nevada anyday) and endless rain of Oregon. If you actually had lived as many places as I have, maybe you'd appreciate Fort Worth a little more.

Fort Worth, TX


re: Fort Worth is a Special City - 2/3/2007
- 12/26/2009
Thanks, Craig. Great pictures.

Fort Worth, TX


re: A bit too hot, a bit too conservative, a bit t
- 12/18/2009
I wish people wouldn't bring politics into city discussions. It's not like the democrats and republicans walk around with nametags identifying their affiliation. Instead of using discussion boards like this to divide yourself from people who you may disagree with, maybe it would be better to focus on what with which you agree. I'm a liberal from California who prefers Texas. The people there are more conservative and religious than I am, but so what? They're nicer, too. They don't drive like they're at war and you're the enemy, like they do in California. People smile and say hello, offer help on a regular basis and seem to like you until they are given a reason not to. Dallas-Fort Worth for such big cities are incredibly friendly, friendlier than any small town in California. The poor parts of town don't come close to how bad much of southern California is. It's more humid but the sun isn't as oppressive as it is in CA. There's no mountains or beaches, but there is beautiful green prairie. And for sporting events, D-FW beats every single city in California. Pro football, baseball and basketball all in the Metroplex. The closest you get to that in CA is the Bay Area, and you have to risk your life in Oakland to watch an NBA game. California is great in theory; but disappointing in execution. I love liberal idealism, but common sense (but compassionate) conservatism has its place; too.

Fort Worth, TX


re: The good and the bad - 9/9/2007
- 12/18/2009
Steven, I completely agree. I'm from southern California and happily traded Texas for CA. The people are wonderful and pleasant; having lived much of my life in California, I got used to people being rude and unwelcoming. The people in Texas are the nicest I've ever met (I've lived in Washington state, Oregon, CA, Nevada, Wyoming, Idaho). Lyle Lovette said "You're not from Texas, but Texas wants you anyway." That's how the people make you feel.

Reno, NV


So many negatives - 10/19/2008
This city is, next to San Bernardino, the ugliest I have ever lived. Lots of old, poorly maintained buildings, bad roads, graffiti, trash strewn parking lots. There doesn't seem to be a "nice" part of the city, although the southern edges turns into decent country-side. The cost of living is ridiculously high, with the majority of the apartment complexes ugly and run down. High crime, the people are like those in Los Angeles; bored, disinterested, and full of antipathy. Winter hits the second week of October, and freezing temperatures (or far below) last until the end of April. Lots of icy wind from the Sierras. The casino district is gray and ugly, uninviting.
The only benefits are the beauty of the mountains to the West, and Reno's proximity to Tahoe for the outdoors types. Lots of shopping, but not much else.

Victorville, CA


Never again - 9/16/2008
I lived in Victorville for almost three years, attended the junior college for about a year and a half. Victor Valley College is good for a JC, but there is really nothing else to recommend this place. High crime, traffic, poor city planning (you'll love those city streets that take you out to the middle of a field and simply end, or all those bottlenecks where three turn lanes merge into one), unfriendly people, one of the worst public library systems in California. On the plus side, its warm almost year round, and there's lots of shopping. But Victorville, Hesperia, Apple Valley and even up to Barstow are just dirt lots with only a few palms and joshua trees to add any beauty. Home prices are falling because people are leaving. I left Southern California for Northern California, and will never go back. If you gave me a million dollars and a mansion in Victorville I wouldn't live there again for six months. A dump, plain and simple. Next to San Bernardino, the worst place I have ever lived.

Canyon, TX


A nice little town - 9/4/2008
I moved here from Northern California to go to West Texas A&M. The town is "dry" (doesn't sell alcohol in the city limits), so there are no bars. Not a whole lot of traffic, and Amarillo is a short ten minute drive. Many of the buildings and businesses are older, giving Canyon a historic feel. As far as rentals go, there's not much above lower end apartment complexes, and some of the homes for rent are substandard. The cost of living is low, but I think people would be willing to pay a bit more for nicer homes and apartments. The town doesn't really feel like a college town; it's so quiet. Just a mile or so south of the University the landscape returns to countryside (like all the outer sections) and the wide, flat view is actually very pretty.
Compared to California, the people are nicer and more neighborly, traffic is lighter and less aggressive. The pace of life is just slower. For some, that might equal boring. There's not a lot to do in Canyon, and not much more to do in Amarillo (which feels more like a suburb of a city than the biggest city in North Texas). Overall, the place is great for nature lovers and people looking for country style living. For parties and the night club crowd, this area will drive you crazy with boredom.

Austin, TX


Austin lover getting a little tired of exclusionar
- 9/25/2006
On this site, there are several complaints of "too liberal" or "liberals stay out," or complaints that "liberals are ruining the great state of Texas." I guess this is someone's idea of southern hospitality. Be hospitable as long as you have the same political views. My own experiences with Austin have been just the opposite, with warm reception from every side, and even though I was born in Southern California, I was never made to feel like a carpetbagger. The people are wonderful, the city is beautiful, and the summers go on forever (if you can take the heat). To out of state visitors, be prepared for real southern flavor from every corner, and if you let them know its appreciated, they'll increase it tenfold. From what I've seen, the majority of Texans are courteous people who welcome you into their state to take a load off and enjoy the scenery. The xenophobes in some of these posts are an exception.
SEARCH & BROWSE

COMPARE COST OF LIVING
What is your annual income?


PREMIUM SUBSCRIPTION

Includes Cost of Living compares for child care, utilities, transportation, health, taxes, housing for home owners vs renters, weather, insurance premiums and so much more.

Try Now

Join BestPlaces